New Bike, Old Chore

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So this is the folding bike I got with my back pay from SSI. (I got some other stuff, but this is the biggest thing.) It’s kind of a delayed-reaction impulse buy. I saw it in the window at a local bike shop one day in late December and decided to buy it because it’s similar to the Dahon I really wanted but about $170 cheaper. When I finally got the money, I bought it first thing. Dumb decision (which is why I’m not giving the brand or model). Buy a Dahon or another good brand if you can. On this one, the low gear isn’t as low enough for climbing, headwinds, or heavy cargo; the handlebar height doesn’t adjust to my size; and it has other drawbacks. Oh, well. At least it’s pretty.

That green thing on the seat post is not part of the bike. I’ve been carrying that gadget, called a Traileron, for years. (The black bump above it is a tail light.) It allows me to pull almost any cart behind the bike without any other hardware. This is actually the first time I used it. In this case, I towed my hand truck with my laundry as the cargo.

The detail of the Traileron is not as easy to see as I’d like because I’m not as good at editing as I’d like. The handle of the hand truck goes into a notch in the Traileron and is secured by a heavy-duty O-ring bent into a shape that works for the purpose.

How did it do? Pretty well. The O-ring is the brilliant part. It gives enough flexibility to let the hand truck adapt to the bike leaning or turning but is tight enough to keep it firmly attached. The sad thing is that Trailerons are not made any more.

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Here’s the “home and dry” picture. I wish the Traileron were still made. I would certainly recommend it as cheap way to get much more work from a bicycle. The user doesn’t even need a luggage rack, and the trailer can be any of many things, such as a child’s wagon, wire grocery cart, or even a golf bag cart. There’s a second O-ring provided that would give more choices. Thus, there’s less need for a trailer custom-made for bicycles. I imagine a good do-it-yourself person could probably make one, but there would be work involved that most poor people don’t have tools, shop space, or know-how to perform.

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6 thoughts on “New Bike, Old Chore

  1. lcy

    How hard is dealing with the folding & unfolding activity ? Is there lots of manual dexterity & strength involved in those 2 processes ? Thanks for the info.

    Reply
  2. foothillbilly Post author

    It’s pretty easy. If I ever get around to doing videos, I’ll post one. This one is slightly harder than the Dahon, but either is pretty easy. The seat has an ordinary quick release to drop it, which you close to keep it in place. The “handle post” has a latch button to release the mechanism, which you then turn out of the way and fold the handlebar unit down beside the front wheel. It’s basically optionally to turn the folding pedals inward. The frame latch has lever to release it. Then you fold the frame in one motion so that the wheels are close together. They’re held in place by a magnet. Unfolding is a simple reversal of the steps.The folded result goes into pretty much any car trunk and takes up very little space at home.

    Reply

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